UK Government Modern Workplaces Consultation

In the United Kingdom, when government departments change or make policy, they listen to public views via a consultation. For those of us in the United States, this is similar to the our government’s request for public comment on a matter. You can read the consultation paper about what government wants to do or change and then send your thoughts back. For those with clients in the UK, this can have an effect on the administration of people in those offices.

The UK Government has just published consultation (Found Here) on its plans for flexible, family-friendly employment practices. There are four key elements:

  1. System of flexible parental leave,
  2. A right for all employees to request flexible working,
  3. Changes to the interaction of annual leave and sick leave, and
  4. Measures to encourage equal pay for equal work between men and women.

The changes to maternity, paternity and parental leave are likely to be of most immediate interest to employers, who have only just got used to the new rules on paternity leave and pay. The key proposal is that maternity leave and pay, reserved exclusively for mothers, will effectively be reduced to 18 weeks. There will then be an entitlement of 30 weeks flexible parental leave which can be shared between the parents in whichever way they wish, subject to their employers’ agreement. 17 weeks of this leave will be paid and 13 weeks will be unpaid. Payment will be on the same basis as now with reference to the same eligibility criteria and set financial limits. Parental leave can be taken by both the mother and father concurrently so that parents can be together. An additional period of 4 weeks paid leave will be reserved for each of the father and the mother. The father will also retain a right to the current 2 week paid paternity leave period available around the time of the baby’s birth. Employers will be concerned that the changes will have financial and administrative consequences and that it will be more difficult to plan for absences. The consultation seeks to minimize administration and states that the default position where the parties cannot agree when leave is taken is for parents to take leave in a continuous block.

The consultation also proposes extending the statutory right to request flexible working to all employees. However to reduce the administrative burden the current statutory process for considering requests will be replaced with a new duty on employers simply to consider requests reasonably. A statutory code of practice would be created to demonstrate a reasonable process. An interesting proposal is that employers will be allowed to take account of any factors they consider relevant in the event that they have to choose between multiple requests. The consultation makes it clear that employers would still have to show that all the requests could not be accommodated for purely business reasons and wider principles of discrimination would still need to be respected.

The Government also takes this opportunity to consult on changes concerning the carryover and rescheduling of annual leave in the light of recent European cases. The consultation proposes amending the Working Time Regulations so that where a worker has not been able to take his annual leave (due to sickness absence) in the current leave year he can carry it over to the next holiday year, provided he does not exceed a four week limit. The consultation recognizes that employers would still need to be aware of other contractual or statutory obligations such as the disability discrimination provisions of the Equality Act 2010.

The equal pay proposals would require tribunals (which have found an employer to have discriminated because of gender in relation to contractual terms or non contractual pay matters) to order that employer to conduct a pay audit. The pay audit would involve comparing the pay of women and men doing equal work and investigating the causes of any potential discrepancies.

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Explore posts in the same categories: Compliance, Employment Practices, Human Resources

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